History of July Fourth

Memorial Day
constitution

Known as the Fourth of July and Independence Day, July Fourth has been a Federal holiday in the United States since 1941, but the tradition of Independence Day celebrations goes back to the 18th century and the American Revolution 1775-83. In June 1776, representatives of the 13 colonies then fighting in the revolutionary struggle weighed a resolution that would declare their independence from Great Britain. On July 2nd, the Continental Congress voted in favor of Independence, and two days later its delegates adopted the Declaration of Independence, a historic document drafted by Thomas Jefferson.

The tradition of patriotic celebration became even more widespread after the War of 1812, in which the United States again faced Great Britain. In 1870, the U.S. Congress made July 4th a federal holiday in 1941, the provision was expanded to grant a paid holiday to all federal employees. Falling in mid-summer, the Fourth of July has since the late 19th century become a major focus of leisure activities and the most common symbol of the holiday is the American flag, and a common musical accompaniment is The Star-Spangled Banner, our national anthem for the United States.

Let us never forget the awesome men and women who have fought for us in the past and present day. From 1776 until the present day, July 4th has been celebrated as the birth of American independence, with typical festivities ranging from fireworks, parades, barbecues, concerts, baseball games, family reunions to casual family or friends gathering chocked full of FUN.

However you and yours chose to celebrate here to Independence and the good ole USA, May God Bless America while we reconnect with our Constitution that is great country is founded on!

Until next year enjoy 2014 July Fourth and keep it REAL … Real FUN that is! Brenda 🙂

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